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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a very confused beginner in the world of moto maintenance.

How do you know when to use grease, anti-seize, or loc-tite? Although manuals give torque settings, they often don't say anything about how to treat threads before fastening.

Can someone give me some guidelines?

Typically, I would use grease or anti-seize on any fasteners that are a different metal from what they are going into (i.e. stainless bolts into aluminum). However, I would want to use Loc-tite thread sealant (of a low/medium formulation) to secure certain critical threads that I don't intend to unfasten and re-fasten regularly.

But here's the question: If I'm replacing the engine mounting bolts (to put on frame sliders), what would I use? The bolts are steel, and are going into the aluminum engine. My gut tells me that grease or (even better) copper-based anti-seize is essential. However, I don't intend to un-fasten these bolts any time soon (with luck), so I think I should use a couple drops of loc-tite as well. So should I use both? Just loctite? Just antiseize?

Can someone educate me in the magical mysteries of thread-treatment?

Thanks all.

--- D
 

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I've used lock-tite on engine mounts on both occasions that I've had to remove them(different bikes). I don't see a need to grease it if you're not going to remove it :twocents:
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
when steel bolts are introduced to an aluminun piece, it is best to keep a barrier of grease between them for, as I am told, this helps keep down rust that is prone when these two metals contact each other.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
when steel bolts are introduced to an aluminun piece, it is best to keep a barrier of grease between them for, as I am told, this helps keep down rust that is prone when these two metals contact each other.
I was told this when my mechanic saw my GPR damper on my bike. He told me to keep the steel pin greased that mounts to the pivoting portion of the damper avaoid any rusting. I asumed this applied to and steel/aluminum combination.
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
anti sieze in the spark plugs. Don't overdo it - a very light coat on all the threads is enough, but make sure you get the threads coated, all the way around.

Lock-tite on fairing bolts are not a good idea. They need some flex or it'll crack your fairings. (learned the hard way).

Lock-tite on your damper is a good idea though. Don't use the strongest strength lockt-tite. The low strength is good enough.

Grease the chain, use PJ Lube or the like.

That's all the advice I've got so far, I'm a newbie bike maintenance guy too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What about engine mounting bolts? It's a high-torque connection, so I'm not going to use Loc-tite, as it's going to be cranked down pretty hard in any case. But given the steel-to-aluminum mating, a little coate of anti-seize is going to make me feel better. Does that sound about right? If not, let me know.

--- D
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Read the service manual carefully and you'll see its says ALL torque reading are for CLEAN and DRY fittings, unless other wise stated.

If you use Anti-seize or grease on the threads because you think you need it cut the torque reading by 50%.

Yes i learned this the hard way:crying:
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Almost all my bolts have a coating of anti-seize. It prevents the galvanitic corrosion between the aluminium engine components and the stainless steel hardware that I'm using to hold it all together.
The only ones that get loctite are the ones I don't want moving at all, like: brake calipers and steering damper.

I check the engine bolts every so often to make sure they're not loosening off but I haven't had a problem yet. I did, however, have the bolts in the steering damper come flying out when I forgot to loctite them on a bumpy road.Oops.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I don't use grease instead get 6 point sockets of good quality. As far as loctite anything you don't want coming off for safety or vibration is a candidate for me. For instance rotors calipers etc I loctite. Exhaust I would also as it tends to vibrate :idunno: On a two stroke buy loctite by the gallon :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I use Loc-tite on my rearsets, as I've had peddles, bolts, nuts, levers etc vibrate loose.

Cheers
 

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Whippet Goode said:
I use Loc-tite on my rearsets, as I've had peddles, bolts, nuts, levers etc vibrate loose.

Cheers
+1. My gear shifter vibrated loose on the autobahn last year. Although not completely dangerous, it psychologically shook me a bit.

I took a page out of the AH64 crew chiefs' "manual of good ideas" after that incident. Use anti-seize on whatever you want. Use torque stripes to make sure it's staying where you left it. This way you can get a quick visual each time you step up to the bike that nothing is loosening up on you.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Used medium Loc-Tite on my replacement engine bolts which came with my LP CF Frame Sliders, will always use after loosening or replacing engine bolts.

Wish I had used Loc-Tite on my rearset left heel-gaurd, as that is on the L.A. Freeway system somewhere...:thumbd:
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
oldgoat said:
Read the service manual carefully and you'll see its says ALL torque reading are for CLEAN and DRY fittings, unless other wise stated.

If you use Anti-seize or grease on the threads because you think you need it cut the torque reading by 50%.

Yes i learned this the hard way:crying:
I hope you're right. I just fitted a GPR damper and when I tightened the steering stem nut (which I put medium strength loctite on) it was supposed to be about 76lbft but I only got it to 50lbft and was too scared to tighten further lest it break. By feel I'd say it is as tight as it was when I removed it. Nonetheless I am a bit worried that I didn't tighten it to the specified value.

In fact I am reluctant to ever use my torque wrench as once I sheared off a crankcase bolt trying to tighten it to the specified torque (against my better judgement) with a torque wrench.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
ndj said:
I hope you're right. I just fitted a GPR damper and when I tightened the steering stem nut (which I put medium strength loctite on) it was supposed to be about 76lbft but I only got it to 50lbft and was too scared to tighten further lest it break. By feel I'd say it is as tight as it was when I removed it. Nonetheless I am a bit worried that I didn't tighten it to the specified value.

In fact I am reluctant to ever use my torque wrench as once I sheared off a crankcase bolt trying to tighten it to the specified torque (against my better judgement) with a torque wrench.
That being said, I've heard from others that they just keep the same torque recommendation regardless of whether they've treated the threads or not. Sounds like a bit of a risk to me. I don't know how torque ratings are set... are they a "maximum" torque for that fastener/connection? Or are they a "recommendation", with some margin for error on either side? I would think that if you're going to use loctite and keep a close eye on vibrating/loosening parts, for many connections there's no harm in being conservative with torque. When it comes to connections that involve fluid retention/leaking, I think torque becomes much more important as the sealing property of the connection has to be preserved.

--- D
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Duster929 said:
I would think that if you're going to use loctite and keep a close eye on vibrating/loosening parts, for many connections there's no harm in being conservative with torque. When it comes to connections that involve fluid retention/leaking, I think torque becomes much more important as the sealing property of the connection has to be preserved.

--- D
PMFJI...but you need to be careful when applying that idea...

The fastener size, and resultant torque spec for a bolted joint is generally calculated to provide the proper joint preload so that the fastener does not "see" a cyclic load condition that can lead to fatigue failure.

Just understand that under0-torquing of a stressed connection can be just as risky as over-torquing.... :twocents:
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Baketech said:
PMFJI...but you need to be careful when applying that idea...

The fastener size, and resultant torque spec for a bolted joint is generally calculated to provide the proper joint preload so that the fastener does not "see" a cyclic load condition that can lead to fatigue failure.

Just understand that under0-torquing of a stressed connection can be just as risky as over-torquing.... :twocents:
It's all so confusing, this black magic of moto maintenance. As in most other things I've learned to do, it all becomes clear with time, practice, and patience.

What does PMFJI mean?

--- D
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Duster929 said:
It's all so confusing, this black magic of moto maintenance. As in most other things I've learned to do, it all becomes clear with time, practice, and patience.

What does PMFJI mean? (Pardon Me For Jumpin In)

--- D
True that... keep chuggin... :thumb:
 

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I think a basic rule can be if you see it there when you took the bolt out then put it on when put the bolt back in. I know pegs, shifter linkage, sets and stuff like that all had loctite on them when I took them off so I put it back on when I put the bolts back in. Remember with the torque values if the books says a value and also says to use one of those compounds then they probably came to that value with the compound in mind.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Don't forget the three levels of loc tite. purple is low, Blue is medium, Red is fuck the next guy.
 
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