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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I previously didn't think you could tie the 954 down at the engine mount/slider attachment points on both sides. There's a nice little hole in the engine mount on the right side of the bike (to hook onto), but the mount on the left is solid. When I loaded my bike today to experiment with tying it down (I dislike Canyon Dancers only because of what they tend to do to my grips), I discovered -yes!- you can in fact get the job done.

The left side engine mount has something of a spacer between the back side of the mount itself and the engine. You can get a hook in there by coming in from the underside. Just be careful not to pinch the small, vinyl covered wire loom in that area with the tie-down hook.

Add a couple more tie-downs to the rear footpeg brackets and you're good to go. Since my truck's tail gate closes and the box has been treated to a tacky, spray-in Rhino Liner bedliner, my 954 stands there as if it had been dropped into wet cement let to cure - not so much as a shudder during the test drive this morning. And none of the straps touch the body, exhaust or any other shiny parts.

Next thing I have to do is figure out where I'm going now that I've conquered the Smokies. Black Hills, the Rockies? Not sure just yet, but I'm working on it...







 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Chain : Next thing I have to do is figure out where I'm going now that I've conquered the Smokies. Black Hills, the Rockies? Not sure just yet, but I'm working on it...
Head west my boy. Open house in santa cruz.
You should have posted earlier, I discovered this around april, first track day. I can close my gate too, rock solid.
 

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Where ya goin Chain? To the store? Here is a loaded truck... Heading out to Birmingham in a few... I use the frame slider points as well, but it doesnt work well when hauling 2 bikes side by side...
Pic 1
Pic 2
Pic 3

Chris
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Meach, you're tempting me.

Roadrunner, nice job. I wouldn't have believed you could get two bikes in the back of a truck. Is that dualie wider in the bed itself (I don't believe they are, but...)?
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the tip about where the tie-downs go. I've been wondering about that myself in preparation for a trackday next month.

Segue to a thread highjack question. Do you guys have any particular recommendations or caveats regarding loading ramps? I noticed Chain's photo shows an aluminum ramp. I really would like a way to get my bike up into my truck as opposed to trailering with a U-Haul.

Thanks.

BTW, nice trucks!
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
maxib : Do you guys have any particular recommendations or caveats regarding loading ramps?  I noticed Chain's photo shows an aluminum ramp.  I really would like a way to get my bike up into my truck as opposed to trailering with a U-Haul.
JC Whitney, my brother. The ramps themselves are made in the U.S. by Ohio Steel. These things are fantastic. Heavy duty, foldable, well built and affordable. I use them to put my riding mower into my truck too. All you need to do is use tie downs to lash them from the underside to the truck's bumper so they stay put when you're riding your bike up/down into/from the truck.

LINK



 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
ratter1 : Hey chain I thought you would at least have those double hooked type tie downs
Double hooked type tie downs. Huh? Mine have two hooks, or am I missing something?
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Chain : Quote (ratter1 @ July 20 2003, 8:36am)Hey chain I thought you would at least have those double hooked type tie downs
Double hooked type tie downs. Huh? Mine have two hooks, or am I missing something?
2 hooks at each end which have their openings opposite each other, so they will not ever let go
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
gentlemen, use a pair of 'soft straps' instead of the hooks themselves around the engine mounts. much better setup. they are about 14 inches long almost like a figure '8' setup. i think one of the girls here had pics of this posted on the old site?
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Chain : Meach, you're tempting me.

Roadrunner, nice job. I wouldn't have believed you could get two bikes in the back of a truck. Is that dualie wider in the bed itself (I don't believe they are, but...)?
Chain..
I have a GMC Sierra 4x4 extended cab regular box and two bikes fit in it just fine.  So you don't need a dualie..    
Nice ramp by the way...same one I have..
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
freq : gentlemen, use a pair of 'soft straps' instead of the hooks themselves around the engine mounts. much better setup. they are about 14 inches long almost like a figure '8' setup. i think one of the girls here had pics of this posted on the old site?
I disagree that the soft straps (a pair of which lay in my toolbox as we speak) are better for hooking the engine mounts. The vinyl coated steel hooks on my tie downs are quite secure, and the warning information that came with my soft hooks suggests that they aren't guaranteed against cutting should they be looped around anything other than a smooth surface (like the engine mounts for instance).

Nice tagline, by the way. Satire, or are you proud of a bonafide criminal past?
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ratter1 : Quote (Chain @ July 20 2003, 11:53pm)Quote (ratter1 @ July 20 2003, 8:36am)Hey chain I thought you would at least have those double hooked type tie downs
Double hooked type tie downs. Huh? Mine have two hooks, or am I missing something?
2 hooks at each end which have their openings opposite each other, so they will not ever let go
Oh, I gotcha. Nah, the ones I've got work flawlessly.

WANTR: Thanks, the ARE super nice ramps, aren't they?
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Chain : JC Whitney, my brother. The ramps themselves are made in the U.S. by Ohio Steel. These things are fantastic. Heavy duty, foldable, well built and affordable. I use them to put my riding mower into my truck too. All you need to do is use tie downs to lash them from the underside to the truck's bumper so they stay put when you're riding your bike up/down into/from the truck.
The ramps look pretty steep. How are they when unloading the bike?
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Serial Thriller : Quote (Chain @ July 20 2003, 8:47am)JC Whitney, my brother. The ramps themselves are made in the U.S. by Ohio Steel. These things are fantastic. Heavy duty, foldable, well built and affordable. I use them to put my riding mower into my truck too. All you need to do is use tie downs to lash them from the underside to the truck's bumper so they stay put when you're riding your bike up/down into/from the truck.
The ramps look pretty steep. How are they when unloading the bike?
They are longer -therefore less steep- than several of the 'motorcycle-specific' ramps I've looked at. To answer your question then, I walk down the ramp on the left, coast the bike down the ramp on the right, and it goes quite smoothy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Chain,

What about going up? How do you do it? I need a good reliable way for one person, me, to accomplish this.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
aBnorMal : Chain,

What about going up?  How do you do it?  I need a good reliable way for one person, me, to accomplish this.
I have the ramps that fold in the middle, length wise. They
are about 40 inches wide. I just put the bike in first &
walk up beside it.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
ZX9RCAM : Quote (aBnorMal @ Aug. 20 2003, 2:45pm)Chain,

What about going up?  How do you do it?  I need a good reliable way for one person, me, to accomplish this.
I have the ramps that fold in the middle, length wise. They
are about 40 inches wide. I just put the bike in first &
walk up beside it.
I am MUCHO afraid to do that. More power to ya though.

I simply set the ramps apart by a foot or so, ride the bike up the right ramp and use the left one for my left foot to steady my balance. Seems to work and I've never so much as had a close call... [knock on wood][/knock on wood]
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Chain : Quote (ZX9RCAM @ Aug. 20 2003, 3:38pm)Quote (aBnorMal @ Aug. 20 2003, 2:45pm)Chain,

What about going up?  How do you do it?  I need a good reliable way for one person, me, to accomplish this.
I have the ramps that fold in the middle, length wise. They
are about 40 inches wide. I just put the bike in first &
walk up beside it.
I am MUCHO afraid to do that. More power to ya though.

I simply set the ramps apart by a foot or so, ride the bike up the right ramp and use the left one for my left foot to steady my balance. Seems to work and I've never so much as had a close call... [knock on wood][/knock on wood]
What happens if you lean to the right a little?

What is wrong with the method I use?
 
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