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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you carry spares for flat tires? Ie, patch kits, CO2, air compressor?

A couple weeks ago, while riding by myself, I got a flat tire in a place without cell reception. Luckily there happen to be a call box (which is rare for California when you're not on a major highway). I didn't have my patch kit with me and was forced to have the bike towed. After spending way too much on a tow (HRCA and Allstate Road Help won't cover since I couldn't call them first), I picked up one of these: http://www.aerostich.com/product.php?productid=16802&cat=0&page=1

My old patch kit got squished and the glue was ruined. So I also picked up a new puncture kit: http://www.aerostich.com/product.php?productid=16776&cat=0&page=1

These don't require glue. Has anyone any experience with this type of tire plug? I practiced on an old tire and found it easy to use. However without air pressure, the plug fell inside after about 10 minutes. The tire I practiced on was not mounted so I couldn't confirm if it will hold when under pressure.

The compressor is expensive but well made. It works pretty quick for a small compressor. I let 10 lbs out of my tire and it had it back up in less than 30 seconds (on a rear tire). With the 929s truck space, it even fits in the trunk, with still room to care a spare shield, camara tripod and other goodies. If I would have prepared and had this stuff when I got the flat it would have saved me $300.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Bicycle pump would take you all day to be able to ride, I get a flat on an average of every 1500 miles (replaced 1 tire in 7 yrs due to wear) so I really should invest. Most of them I've noticed in my driveway luckily
 

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I've never had a flat, so I'll take my chances with a $5 bicycle pump vs $80 for the electric one. I just need to get enough air in it to limp to a station anyway.

That non-glue patch kit looks nice though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
ConqSoft said:
I've never had a flat, so I'll take my chances with a $5 bicycle pump vs $80 for the electric one. I just need to get enough air in it to limp to a station anyway.

That non-glue patch kit looks nice though.
I've only had 1 other flat and I rode it 20 miles, with zero air in the rear tire. Steering stabilizer does a lot of work with a flat tire. Tire stayed on the rim and once you got over 25-30 mph it actually stood up like it had air.

You should try airing up your tire, say just to 10-15 lbs with the bicycle pump. Just to see if you still had enough energy left over to ride it afterwords. :)
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I carry one from BMW (which comes standard when you buy a BMW). They're rather complete.

I haven't had a flat since I started street riding over two decades ago... that's until earlier this summer. Then I had to walk a goodly amount. Finally got a ride from a family in a minivan (dad rides a CBR 600) - they lived in a town 20-miles from my home and still gave me a ride. Gawd, motorcyclists can be the best. Then I had to get my truck, drive back to where I left my bike. Push it in (which is not fun on a flat), lash it down; drive home; unload. Wait until morning because it was now late at night. Remove tire; take it to a shop and have it patched; bring it home and remount. Not a fun 24-hrs :( .

Bought the repair kit the next day... never leave home without it.

Cheers
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Although I have not used the Stop N Go kit for my bike, I have used it for my Z06, which does not have a spare tire. It worked well and was an easy kit to use. It held up well until I returned home (150 miles) and got an internal flat patch placed over the Stop N Go mushroom plug. It's been going strong now for two years and has been safely used at 120 mph on a controlled course situation without leakage.

All in all, I highly recommend it. I now own two kits which I carry on whichever bike or car I happen to be driving.

My first repair kit was the BMW kit which I've never used on the road, but I've practiced with it on a worn out tire. It cost me $20 about 10 years ago. It's a good kit, but I personally like the Stop N Go better. I highly recommend everyone practice with whatever repair kit they buy as it really takes a lot of anxiety out of a bad situation in the field.

I use a 12 volt air compressor which I got from Wally World for $25 and removed from the factory case to supply air. It's small enough to fit into the 954 trunk easily along with all the other stuff. (I really don't know how the 1000RR folks live without a trunk!) However, I'm still paranoid enough to carry C02 cartridges just in case!

It's a good product and provides a little piece of mind when travelling alone in uncharted territory! This reminds me that I should probably order new plugs every 5 years for the kit to keep fresh ones available.

Good choice on the kit!
 

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I've found that 10$ campbell hausfeld compressor @ walmart can be field stripped to the point of being diminutive enough to fit in most storage areas.

I just busted mine out of the housing and haven't found a good package for it, but it was for use with my Ranger not my bike - and I could fit it in the door pocket without issue. Certainly not 80$ but would likely work for most.
 

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SomeStrangeGuy said:
I've found that 10$ campbell hausfeld compressor @ walmart can be field stripped to the point of being diminutive enough to fit in most storage areas.

I just busted mine out of the housing and haven't found a good package for it, but it was for use with my Ranger not my bike - and I could fit it in the door pocket without issue. Certainly not 80$ but would likely work for most.
Dont tell Eatnasphalt, but the guts of his $80 pump is nothing more than that $10 Campbell Hausfeld:thumb: The guy that makes them claimes his motors/pumps are "better" and "tricked out", but admits he sources them from the same import the CH gets theirs. I went with the $10 model, tossed the blue plastic housing, shortened the hose, and put aligator clips on the wires (soon to be replaced with a BMW plug end) . I carry it wrapped in a couple of shop towels in a zip lock baggie. Knocking on wood, I havent had to use it in the field yet.

Mike
 

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G-Force Junkie said:
Dont tell Eatnasphalt, but the guts of his $80 pump is nothing more than that $10 Campbell Hausfeld:thumb: The guy that makes them claimes his motors/pumps are "better" and "tricked out", but admits he sources them from the same import the CH gets theirs. I went with the $10 model, tossed the blue plastic housing, shortened the hose, and put aligator clips on the wires (soon to be replaced with a BMW plug end) . I carry it wrapped in a couple of shop towels in a zip lock baggie. Knocking on wood, I havent had to use it in the field yet.

Mike
I think the difference is it's a Mabuchi RS-580 motor with bearings instead of bushings...I kid you not.

p.s. Dishonorable sidenote sort of related to this topic: I have a sale pending on the KLR :( It's related cause it has a new rear tube :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
G-Force Junkie said:
Dont tell Eatnasphalt, but the guts of his $80 pump is nothing more than that $10 Campbell Hausfeld:thumb: The guy that makes them claimes his motors/pumps are "better" and "tricked out", but admits he sources them from the same import the CH gets theirs. I went with the $10 model, tossed the blue plastic housing, shortened the hose, and put aligator clips on the wires (soon to be replaced with a BMW plug end) . I carry it wrapped in a couple of shop towels in a zip lock baggie. Knocking on wood, I havent had to use it in the field yet.

Mike
I use the same $10 stripped Walmart version...the only caveat I would add is don't grab it after it's been running a bit... it will burn the shit out of you... :sless:
 

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Oh yeah - I will see if I can find a pic, but I had a heatsink from an old R/C car that I had that fit on that motor perfectly...problem is, uhh, I said "hey that would work awesome" then promptly put it back into the den of r/c crap...will see if I can find it. i never actually used it for my flat - bought it after :D
 

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I have a compact pump and puncture kit under the seat - have had to use it twice, very handy. Got me out of a heck of a lot of trouble!

Z...
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
G-Force Junkie said:
Dont tell Eatnasphalt, but the guts of his $80 pump is nothing more than that $10 Campbell Hausfeld:thumb: The guy that makes them claimes his motors/pumps are "better" and "tricked out", but admits he sources them from the same import the CH gets theirs. I went with the $10 model, tossed the blue plastic housing, shortened the hose, and put aligator clips on the wires (soon to be replaced with a BMW plug end) . I carry it wrapped in a couple of shop towels in a zip lock baggie. Knocking on wood, I havent had to use it in the field yet.

Mike
My 929 still rides as good as new even though there are 954s and 1000RRs running around. Doesn't make it any lesser a machine.

Same goes for my choice of pump. :D
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
EatnAsphalt said:
Do you carry spares for flat tires? Ie, patch kits, CO2, air compressor?

A couple weeks ago, while riding by myself, I got a flat tire in a place without cell reception. Luckily there happen to be a call box (which is rare for California when you're not on a major highway). I didn't have my patch kit with me and was forced to have the bike towed. After spending way too much on a tow (HRCA and Allstate Road Help won't cover since I couldn't call them first), I picked up one of these: http://www.aerostich.com/product.php?productid=16802&cat=0&page=1

My old patch kit got squished and the glue was ruined. So I also picked up a new puncture kit: http://www.aerostich.com/product.php?productid=16776&cat=0&page=1

These don't require glue. Has anyone any experience with this type of tire plug? I practiced on an old tire and found it easy to use. However without air pressure, the plug fell inside after about 10 minutes. The tire I practiced on was not mounted so I couldn't confirm if it will hold when under pressure.

The compressor is expensive but well made. It works pretty quick for a small compressor. I let 10 lbs out of my tire and it had it back up in less than 30 seconds (on a rear tire). With the 929s truck space, it even fits in the trunk, with still room to care a spare shield, camara tripod and other goodies. If I would have prepared and had this stuff when I got the flat it would have saved me $300.
triple A helps
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Good thread! I have one of those kits, but I need to practice using it on an old tire.

AAA in NJ won't touch motorcycles. I have a Motorcycle Towing Services membership. Haven't had to use them, thankfully, but if I have to, I know they'll send someone who knows how to properly tow a bike. You wouldn't believe what happens if you have to rely on the the towtrucks that come to "assist" you on the NJ Turnpike, or any regular towing service anywhere, for that matter. They have no clue how to tow a bike.
 
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