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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do any of yall use wheel chocks in the bed of your truck when hauling your bike?
I've seen lots of bikes secured with the wheel up against the front of the bed (and I've done it before), but that piece of metal doesn't seem all that sturdy.
Any thoughts?
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I'd like to know this too, I might have to move and will have to put the bike in the back of the U-Haul.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Friend of mine mounted his wheel chock to a piece of plywood cut into the shape of his truck bed. It's very sturdy. I think he got the pit bull one though. It doesn't really support the bike much, just another place to tie it down so it doesn't roll backward.

-Shrub
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The one you picture is a Pingle and is not very good for sportbikes. The problem with the Pingle is the chock contacts the larger disk rotors, a very BAD thing. You can remedy this by placing a piece of 1' board under the front wheel at the chock, but if you have a choice, go with a pit bull. They're the best. I have 4 ot five of them. I have never mounted one in a P/U truck, but it would add some stability to the carry of the bike. The chocks come with releases that allow them to be removed with a minimal amount of hardware left behind.

For a trailer a chock is manditory IMO.
 

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I have a Baxley Sport Chock mounted in my van, and only snug down the back of the bike.
They have rubber feet on them, though, and you can use it unmounted in the bed of a truck with four tie downs, according to them.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I highly recommend to anyone thinking about wheel chocks to check out the Bike Grab:

Bike Grab

I think someone on this forum turned me onto this product, which was exactly what I needed for my rental trailer to get the 'blade to a track day.

The beauty is this does not require mounting holes into your pickup or rental trailer, but could be done if you wanted.  I liked it because I could easily transfer it to whatever vehicle or trailer I had.  In fact, I knew this was the *right stuff* when I put the 'blade in it in the garage and it just stood upright without support as if the bike was on my Pitbull stand, just like one of the pictures show.  However, for the IQ impaired, also use tie downs.  (I used a Canyon Dancer and Ancra red tie downs with the bike grab on a 300 mile tow with nary a problem.  Twenty miles of that trip was on scarrified, chewed up road that was going to be resurfaced in a week.)

John was very helpful and demonstrated above average customer service when he assured me I would have my stand before I needed to go to the track, and he was right.  This in spite of the fact that the stands were out of stock from the UK when I placed my order.

There is some minor assembly required, but nothing complex.  If you know righty tighty, lefty loosey, and have access to a torque wrench, you got it made!

It is a little pricey, but not when you consider it will be a tool you can use for a lifetime and easily transfer from vehicle to vehicle, and bike to bike.

I have no interests or stock in this company or product.  Once in awhile a truly excellent motorcycle or accessory comes along that I would like to share my recommendation with others.  Since you already know about the Fireblade, the Bike Grab was a product report I could give!!!

John's info below:

John Brown
Driven Gear
1-800-627-1700
www.bike-lift.com
[email protected]

edit: Oops, almost forgot...you gotta check out the Tommy Jack too! No, trust me on this, you gotta, even if you're not interested!
 

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Ya, the front of the bead isnt so strong, but you shouldnt have to have so much force on it to bend it to the cab. Use strap off the passenger pegs to the rear corners of the bed, this will secure the back, as well ad upt some reward tension on the bike taking pressure off the front. Once it strapped down, ont tip as a security measure if you dont have a chock is to run a tie down strap from one front corner, through the front wheel and wrap around one of the 'spokes' and on to the other corner. This will keep the front wheel from walking sideways. My 929 didnt budge an inch in the 4500 miles to and from Grattan last year like this.

Mike
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
maxib : I highly recommend to anyone thinking about wheel chocks to check out the Bike Grab:

!
The 'Bike Grab' works good, I have two of them that I am
willing to sell, because I want a Baxley Sport Chock.
Much Much better!!!

You roll into a baxley & it grabs the tire from behind. Alot
safer & more stable than the 'Bike Grab'.
 
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