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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I'd like to make sure everything on my 929 is correctly tightened but...
I've searched eBay for TR's but I'm not sure which size or type to go for.
Can anyone suggest a decent general torque wrench and suggest what it's worth spending please?

Many thanks,

Daniel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
For everything except the axle nut, you will need a good Lbs. in. wrench (usually 1/4" drive) and a good 3/8" drive Lbs. Ft. good from 20 Lbs. Ft. and up, which means it starts at about 14 Lbs. Ft.
 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have 3 torque wrenches from Harbor Freight(1/4, 3/8 & 1/2"). I know they don't have the best reputation but I tested mine for accuracy against my dads craftsman and they were spot on. Plus, the price is great and they are quite sturdy as mine are 3 years old, used often and holding up well. Harbor Freight Tools
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have 3 torque wrenches from Harbor Freight(1/4, 3/8 & 1/2"). I know they don't have the best reputation but I tested mine for accuracy against my dads craftsman and they were spot on. Plus, the price is great and they are quite sturdy as mine are 3 years old, used often and holding up well. Harbor Freight Tools

Those are the same ones I have! Well, plus a digital craftsman one I bought, because I thought it was cool and on a total impulse buy.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
So is it best to have at least a couple? I'm still a bit confused; wouldn't it suffice to go for one wrench that is capable of torquing from 20-150lbs?
Maybe it depends if there's much on the 929 which requires less than 20lbs which I don't know off the top of my head....thanks again for the suggestions though!
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
No, because at the ends of the scale, a torque wrench could be off by almost 20%. Also there are many bolts on your bike that require 12 Lbs ft or less of torque. That's why you need at least two wrenches. And one should be a Lbs In wrench.
One more thing about click type wrenches. When using it on a very low torque aplication, I always set the wrench, then put it on a larger bolt to click it a couple of times and it is set. Sometimes, if you don't do that, the wrench will not click when it should and you will over tighten the first bolt. This is really bad for small bolts that go into aluminum. This is true of any click type wrench regardless of how much you payed for it.
 

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I have two; 3/8" and 1/2" to cover the lighter chores to the heavier ones. You do not want a one-fit all apporach. I also don't use the scale type but the click types. Make sure you put the click types back to the "stop" position after you are done using it.
 

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I have two; 3/8" and 1/2" to cover the lighter chores to the heavier ones. You do not want a one-fit all apporach. I also don't use the scale type but the click types. Make sure you put the click types back to the "stop" position after you are done using it.
:plus1: This is what I do too. I have a 10-75 and a 20-150. Both Craftsman. I want to get a inch-lb torque wrench too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What kind of bolt are you working with? I may get flamed for this, but in my long experience I've found that the only bolts that really require accurate torque settings are those for engine parts. Your general frame and chassis bolts need to be tightened so that they will not come loose. If you're not rebuilding an engine, you can probably skip the torque wrench all together. Watch a pit crew work on a bike. Most likely you'll not see a torque wrench anywhere.
 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
any4xx, i dont often use a torque wrench and think your right with not needed one all the time, but you never know. With how bikes are engineered these days, everything is pretty much needed for some part in the experience, so peace of mind is worth 100$ or something to me. I use my dads old one, and it works wonders, goes from 5-200 something. Which came in handy as my muffler needed a bolt to be tightened to 9ft-lbs... Weird but interesting. In that case, i tightened it less than i thought should be needed.

Also, torque wrenches... this may be common sense, but dont hold the wrench up close, hold it on the grip provided and further from the drive... if you dont over tighten the bolt.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
What kind of bolt are you working with? I may get flamed for this, but in my long experience I've found that the only bolts that really require accurate torque settings are those for engine parts. Your general frame and chassis bolts need to be tightened so that they will not come loose. If you're not rebuilding an engine, you can probably skip the torque wrench all together. Watch a pit crew work on a bike. Most likely you'll not see a torque wrench anywhere.
I have to disagree. If torque values were of no importance, why would manufactures go to the trouble of listing values for every nut and bolt on the bike?
 
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I always set the wrench, then put it on a larger bolt to click it a couple of times and it is set. Sometimes, if you don't do that, the wrench will not click when it should and you will over tighten the first bolt.
good point. Another method I use on very low torque settings, I try and turn the wrench smoothly all the way through in one steady motion instead of stop and go, stop and go. This gets the wrench to click more easily.
 
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
What kind of bolt are you working with? I may get flamed for this, but in my long experience I've found that the only bolts that really require accurate torque settings are those for engine parts. Your general frame and chassis bolts need to be tightened so that they will not come loose. If you're not rebuilding an engine, you can probably skip the torque wrench all together. Watch a pit crew work on a bike. Most likely you'll not see a torque wrench anywhere.
Hi any4xx,

The 929 I've recently bought is the first bike I've owned that I've really want to look after as well as I can as it's in such good condition. The fact that its a pretty powerful bike makes me feel like I want everything to be spot on with it if I start tinkering with it. I didn't bother with torque figures with my first couple of bikes, but when I'm giving the 929 some beans I want to know that things aren't going to start falling off!
I'm not particularly techinical but would like to do more myself, so I really appreciate all your thoughts on wrenches; I'm going to get a couple.

Daniel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Most people tighten small bolts way too tight. Sometimes it strips, sometimes it breaks the bolt. Small bolts that go into aluminum threads are the worse. A good torque wrench will do two things, it will protect the bolt and it will teach your hand what each torque setting feels like.
For motorcycles, I like using "T" handle wrenches on almost everything since very few bolts need more tightening than you can get with a "T" handle. Plus, they are fast!

One tip:
When drilling or tapping aluminum, WD-40 is the best lubricant I have ever found. It is better than cutting oil (For Aluminum). Cutting oil is better for cast and steel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I guess I should have kept my opinion to myself. Yes, all bolts do require a specific torque setting. But "Critical" is only necessary in stresses engine bolts. The rest can be close enough. But I was also assuming that most folks have "the feel" for tight enough and not too tight. I've been tightening bolts for over 40 years. When in doubt, not-too-tight with some blue Loctite is always safe.

But to address the torque-wrench specs, I believe it was already stated, but they are accurate in the middle of their range and not so much at the top and bottom of their scales. One again though, this will only be a problem if you are working on rod bolts. head bolts, or main bearing bolts. ANY torque wrench will do you just fine if you are just working with chassis fasteners. I have three torque wrenches. What you want to do is to get the service manual, figure out what range of torque settings you will most often be working with, then get the one wrench that will cover those.

Oh, and ALWAYS store your torque wrench unloaded! Dial it back to its lowest setting so as not to stress it right out of spec. And if you REALLY care, send it off to be recalibrated every year. That costs about as much as a less-expensive new unit though.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I guess I should have kept my opinion to myself.
Why? I agree with just about everything you've said. The only caveat is that most people do not have 40+ years of wrech turning under their belt (30+ for me). I think alot of people that buy their first torque wrench really have no starting point when it comes down to applying said torque to said bolt. They want to know just how tight, tight is without ruining anything.
 
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