Honda Pioneer Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
G

·
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know some smartazz is gonna post and say why I don't need them in AZ, but it is going to 32 as a low this weekend and I want warner gloves. My problem has always been that most winter riding gloves are to puffy and I can't feel the controls. So does anyone know of a glove that is not so puffy yet still warm. Just for this weekend I'm gonna try a set of polypropolene liners in my leather gloves.

Dano
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I was looking for a pair myself. Has to be windproof, so has to have nylon with a tight enough weave so wind can not pass through. Thinsulate would also be nice as it is a thin insulator and will not reduce feel as much.
I found some locally here for approx $30 to $70CDN. I don't remember what brand they were though.
Hope it helps.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am looking as well. I have heard Belstaff makes good winter gloves, but haven't yet had a chance to look into them other than online.

I have a pair of bulky @ss winter gloves but they are rediculously warm and not flexible.

Warm, water/wind proof and not bulky are definitely my prerequisites too.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Well my dad is on travel and is in NH right now so he went to a shop I always got my stuff from. He spoke with the owner and ended up getting me some of the A-stars winter gloves. Paid for them over the phone and as I did when I lived there, got a really good price for them. He'll be home from travel today so tonight I'll have to give them a test ride when he gets here. Looking forward to some warm gloves, froze my hands on Sunday when it was 31 degrees on the ride. I'll let you know how they feel and how well they work....stay tuned.

Dano
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Another key to keeping your hands warm is making sure your torso remains warm. A rider's fingers will start getting cold because the blood withdraws from the extremities when the body detects your torso getting colder. The body is trying to keep the blood near your vital organs when it is cold. That is why an electric vest works so well at keeping the whole body warm. If you plan on riding in sub 40 degree weather often (even in AZ), I'd recommend a Widder electric vest over a pair of winter riding gloves.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Unfortntely warmer gloves mean a bit more bulk. Thing to aim is NOT a tight fit for then you end up being the looser.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have the Alpinestars Winter Gloves, and they are SWEET!! They are not bulky at all, they keep me warm, and they also have a waterproof covering that is in the wrist closure that can be used if it is damp out or raining. The fit is amazing as it is with most A-Stars gear.

I highly recommend them for anyone riding in the cooler months!;)
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Something you might try that doesn't add much bulk is to wear latex gloves under you riding gloves. They help quite a bit. I use Gerbing electric gloves when not using my regular gloves.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The best solution in my opinion is heated grips. You can pick them up for $35 and an afternoon of making up a switch bracket and routing wires. You will never again have cold hands or have to deal with crappy winter gloves. This will be the first mod I make on every bike I ever buy again.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Joel, more details please? Brand, distributor, hassles involved in wiring, if any, etc.? Do you end up with a lot of funky looking external wiring?

TIA

edit: oh, and of course the obligatory pics if you can :D
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Only trouble I had with heated grips with the lack of heat in my 2 fingers in each hand that stay on the levers all the time and the back side of my hand also wasn't very warm. Compared to electric gloves that is.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
I bought these Helds today - Exactgrip Gore-Tex Sport Riding gloves link , and rode home in light rain with them. They have the latest technology Gore-Tex and Outlast lining that moderates temperature releasing heat when hot, and holding it in when cold. They are very comfortable and really do seem to maintain a good temperature for your hands. They are somewhat thick without being bulky and have a rubber blade built into the index finger for shield wiping.

p.s. Nice GS Figment!!!
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I spent a few months keeping an eye out for a great pair of sporty winter gloves which weren't too bulky but still gave good warmth, were waterproof and had lots of protection like hard knuckles etc.

I found them!





Belstaff Thermo Sport.
Pittards® Armor-Tan™ leather (ceramic impregnation enhances abrasion resistance) • Thinsulate® thermal lining • Carbon knuckle guards • Side palm protection • Cuff and wrist adjuster • Kevlar® reinforcement inside.






Pros:
Warm, comfy, easy to feel controls, not much more bulkier than a summer glove. Waterproof. They feel strong, solid yet very pliant and easy to move my fingers in. The leather is soft and the armour feels tough. I expect that they'd really hold up in a crash. Warm enough for winter, cool enough for English summers.

Cons:
Lack a rubber wiper for clearing visor when raining.
Don't have an inner cuff to go inside jacket and prevent rain from running down my sleeve and into the glove.


Heated Grips:
Absolutely recommend these. It's like holding a hot cup of tea! Even with the Thermo Sport gloves on above I can really feel the heat, it can actually get too hot.:D

I've got the Daytona heated grips which are the same thickness as regular grips. The wires are small and almost invisible if it's tidily fitted. The switch is easy to operate with gloves on and has an Off, On and Start settings. The Start setting is a boost setting for extra heat. On is a mild setting so you get the bars kept a bit warm. Somewhere between the two is ideal so I tend to spend 10 minutes on Start, then 10 minutes at the On setting, and just change them when necessary.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Bacchus said:
Joel, more details please? Brand, distributor, hassles involved in wiring, if any, etc.? Do you end up with a lot of funky looking external wiring?

TIA

edit: oh, and of course the obligatory pics if you can :D
I will snap a few pics of what I did as soon as I get a few minutes. It's taking me a bit longer to get this done than I thought.
 
G

·
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
OK, Here's some information on the heated grips I installed on my 929.

The heating elements I installed are similar to these I found after a very quick google search: dual-star


You need to remove your stock grips, and stick the adhesive side of the flat resistors onto the handle bars. I used some glass tape on the left grip so the metal bar wouldn't suck all the heat out of the heater. I don't know if that's necessary or not. You have to find a spot to mount the switch. I've attached a picture of where I mounted the switch, and also a picture of the wires that lead to the grips. I wrapped the wires in shrink tubing, which looks very similar to Honda's wire wraps. So far no one has asked what the extra wires were for. They blend in with the OEM wires nearly perfectly.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top